A Soldier’s Prayer

(found on the body of an American Soldier during World War I)

Lord God, I have never spoken to you,
but now I want to say how do you do?

You see God they told me you didn’t exist,
and like a fool I believed all this.

Last night from a shell hole I saw your sky,
I figured right then they had told me a lie.

Had I take time to see the things you made,
I would have known they weren’t calling a spade a spade.

I wonder God if you’ll take my hand,
somehow I feel that you’ll understand.

Funny how I had come to this hellish place,
before I had time to see your face.

I guess there really isn’t much more to say,
but I’m sure glad God that I met you today.

I guess zero hour will soon be here,
But I’m not afraid since I know you’re near.

The signal, well God I’ll have to go,
I like you lots, I want you to know.

Look now this will be a horrible fight,
who knows I may come to your house tonight.

Though I wasn’t friendly to you before,
I wonder God if you’d wait at your door.

Look I’m crying, I’m shedding tears,
I’ll have to go now, God, goodbye.

Strange now since I met you,
I’m not afraid to die.

Author Unknown

 


Sources:

https://cpco.on.ca/files/8113/8437/4534/A_Soldiers_Prayer.pdf

In the early 70s this poem was given to Ravi Zacharias written by an American soldier in Vietnam: Lord God, I have…

Posted by The Red Letters Project on Sunday, 26 May 2013

why i watch movies?

why i watch movies?

because intend to change my mindset;

a change in mindset changes my perspective;

the new perspective alters my priorities;

the new order of priorities renews my focus;

a renewed focus revives my thrill;

this thrill fuels my hopes;

The power which enabled an ignorant, illiterate colored child to conquer an intelligent man…

One afternoon he was helping his uncle grind wheat in an old

fashioned mill. The uncle operated a large farm on which a number

of colored sharecrop farmers lived. Quietly, the door was opened,

and a small colored child, the daughter of a tenant, walked in and took her place near the door.

The uncle looked up, saw the child, and barked at her roughly,

“what do you want?”

Meekly, the child replied, “My mammy say send her fifty cents.”

“I’ll not do it,” the uncle retorted, “Now you run on home.”

“Yas sah,” the child replied. But she did not move.

The uncle went ahead with his work, so busily engaged that he

did not pay enough attention to the child to observe that she did

not leave. When he looked up and saw her still standing there, he

yelled at her, “I told you to go on home! Now go, or I’ll take a switch

to you.”

The little girl said “yas sah,” but she did not budge an inch.

The uncle dropped a sack of grain he was about to pour into

the mill hopper, picked up a barrel stave, and started toward the

child with an expression on his face that indicated trouble.

Darby held his breath. He was certain he was about to witness

a murder. He knew his uncle had a fierce temper. He knew that

colored children were not supposed to defy white people in that part

of the country.

When the uncle reached the spot where the child was

standing, she quickly stepped forward one step, looked up into his

eyes, and screamed at the top of her shrill voice,

“MY MAMMY’S GOTTA HAVE THAT FIFTY CENTS!”

The uncle stopped, looked at her for a minute, then slowly laid

the barrel stave on the floor, put his hand in his pocket, took out

half a dollar, and gave it to her.

The child took the money and slowly backed toward the door,

never taking her eyes off the man whom she had just conquered.

After she had gone, the uncle sat down on a box and looked out the

window into space for more than ten minutes. He was pondering,

with awe, over the whipping he had just taken.


Excerpt from Think and Grow Rich Book by Napoleon Hill

Cats In The Cradle

My child arrived just the other day
He came to the world in the usual way
But there were planes to catch, and bills to pay
He learned to walk while I was away
And he was talking ‘fore I knew it, and as he grew
He’d say, I’m gonna be like you, dad
You know I’m gonna be like you

And the cat’s in the cradle and the silver spoon
Little boy blue and the man in the moon
When you coming home, dad?
I don’t know when
But we’ll get together then
You know we’ll have a good time then

My son turned ten just the other day
He said, thanks for the ball, dad, come on let’s play
Can you teach me to throw, I said, not today
I got a lot to do, he said, that’s okay
And he walked away, but his smile never dimmed
Said, I’m gonna be like him, yeah
You know I’m gonna be like him

And the cat’s in the cradle and the silver spoon
Little boy blue and the man in the moon
When you coming home, dad?
I don’t know when
But we’ll get together then
You know we’ll have a good time then

Well, he came from college just the other day
So much like a man I just had to say
Son, I’m proud of you
Can you sit for a while?
He shook his head, and he said with a smile
What I’d really like, dad, is to borrow the car keys
See you later
Can I have them please?

And the cat’s in the cradle and the silver spoon
Little boy blue and the man in the moon
When you coming home, dad?
I don’t know when
But we’ll get together then
You know we’ll have a good time then

I’ve long since retired and my son’s moved away
I called him up just the other day
I said, I’d like to see you if you don’t mind
He said, I’d love to, dad, if I could find the time
You see, my new job’s a hassle, and the kid’s got the flu
But it’s sure nice talking to you, dad
It’s been sure nice talking to you
And as I hung up the phone, it occurred to me
He’d grown up just like me
My boy was just like me

And the cat’s in the cradle and the silver spoon
Little boy blue and the man in the moon
When you coming home, dad?
I don’t know when
But we’ll get together then
You know we’ll have a good time then

~ Harry Chapin

Rendezvous ~ Not Alone

unnamed

just look, because why not?
look, its a beautiful… *day;
so look, like gaze and no stare;
like lustfully but nonchalantly;


am careful, maybe am not;
am creative, that is good;
i see, and that’s okay;
if i touch, don’t tempt me;


oh goodness, what am i doing?
this ain’t me, what am i thinking?
transfixed, what do i do?
are stolen waters really sweeter?

Njira ikura igiaga ime kwina riua ~ Kikuyu proverb

njira ikura igiaga ime kwina riua ( mundu ukura datungaga wao )

persistent resistance to advice is the road to misery


this is a Kikuyu proverb promoting adherence to counsel and being susceptible to instructions.